5 years ago
Negster
Fresh Member
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Im in the process of refinishing my childhood dresser and am just curious of where and when it was made. Google search dosnt really come up with much other then another one at an auction with no photo or information.








Chris

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5 years ago
bullfrog
Guest

we have a dresser with a mirror on top and the same tag as yours. Can't find any info either. Our dresser has been in the family since spprox 1911.

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4 years ago
Bretticus
Guest

We have the same information on a tag that has been sloppily varnished over on a dresser we picked up for $25. I cannot seem to find any information on it whatsoever. Any luck discovering an origin?

See pictures here:
http://picasaweb.google.com/bretticus/Dresser? feat=directlink

The mirror has a Chittenden & Eastman tag on the back (see pictures.)

The finish appears to be a funky faux tiger wood method as evidenced by the stain (and pattern) being worn slightly off the top and the wood below appearing to be oak (anybody know what imperial quartered oak is? I know quartered oak is how it's milled and is premium wood. that's it though.)

Can anyone put an approximate date on this?

Thanks.

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3 years ago
mimboden
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I have a similar faux tiger finish dresser with Barnard and Cope information on back. I wanted to check around before I started in case I had a valuable piece. I'm guessing because there is nothing on the internet about Barnard and Cope furniture that it's not worth much. I did find info on the man Barnard but not much else. I can't decide whether to strip it or just paint it. It's still solid but not in very good condition.

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3 years ago
Barnard's Imperial ...
Guest

I purchased a similar dresser and did not realize that it was a faux finish. I wish to sell it and purchasers ask if it is really oak, although the partial label on the back says "Barnard's Imperial Quartered Oak". I have no idea what it is worth. Because of the faux finish, I am sure that that devalues the worth.
Ideas or suggestions?

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3 years ago
Marg
Guest

I just picked up and old painted dresser to use in an outbuilding. Got it home and realized it was oak, so examined it more closely. There is an intact label: Made by Barnard Cope Manf. in Minneapolis and looks a great deal like the first picture, that started these Q and As.
I stripped the paint (and contact paper) off the top to get a look at the wood beneath. Six or eight cigarette burns--so I'm satisfied that I did the right thing by looking. Plan now to just continue on and refinish it all. But, I'll have to find another old dresser for outbuilding. I'm already attached to this one and think it will enjoy living in my home.

Looks like Mr. Barnard was at Barnard Cope from 1875-1884. His sons continued there after he retired-but have yet to determine if the name remained Barnard and Cope.
So...whatever pieces those of us interested have--the earliest manufactured under that name is 1875. More digging to see when/if the name changed to something else.

My label has other writing that I cannot yet decipher. Definately says "Delivered To" and there is pencil writing that I can't make out following. Perhaps when better eyes than mine take a look, I can find out more.

I'll stay in touch about what I learn. Please, others do the same.

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3 years ago
jOE
Guest

dID YOU EVER FIND ANYTHING OUT ABOUT BARNARD FURNITURE?

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2 years ago
Marg
Guest

No further info, but I still look

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2 years ago
chris
Guest

Hi,
Just picked up a few pieces at an estate sale, same information, Barnard Manufacturing company, Minn. The TO: says that it went to Dr. Barnard, Los Angeles, CA.

We have marble tops on the dresser and desk, and a full sized bed with "lions" on the headboard. Does anyone know if this antique furniture is worth anything??

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2 years ago
mimboden
Guest

I'm no expert, but I don't think it's worth anything

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2 years ago
Donnarup
Guest

Hello all your dressers are amish made furniture. also can be worth allot

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2 years ago
chris
Guest

Is the a market or forum to sell these antiques? I live in Florida and no one is this climate is interested in dark furniture, much less antiques! I'd love to see them preserved vs. painted.

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2 years ago
Marg
Guest

Thank you for posting! Hey, maybe our Barnards are Amish made and worth something after all. That's good news. Do you have a source where we could learn more? Thanks again

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2 years ago
Marg
Guest

I removed paint and contact paper from the piece I bought. Also smoothed over cigarette/cigar burns. In the process, of course, the faux finish came off. I'm Ok with that, as it was painted when I bought it. I live in Alaska. Probably difficult to ship outside of the state.

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2 years ago
chris
Guest

How does one go about learning if they are worth anything???

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1 year ago
jimangela
Fresh Member
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I've had the occasion to buy Chinese made furniture twice recently from this shop in Shanghai China. The first was a dining table with six chairs. The second was two bedside tables of elm whitewood, unfinished. Both products appear to be of good quality, good materials, and at prices no Australian manufacturer could hope to compete.
What struck me about the beside tables, in particular, was the quality and sturdiness of their construction. Solid wood throughout, reinforced corners. They were also meticulously packed away in cardboard cartons – fully assembled – and well sanded.
In the past I have bought a number of pieces of Australian made whitewood furniture, and the construction was nearly always substandard, with numerous corners cut (metaphorically speaking!). I used to spend ages reinforcing these items, sanding and finishing. Only then did I get a reasonable bit of furniture.The difference between good and bad furniture was often the effort that is put into sanding and finishing.
On the other hand, I recently ask easterncurio to make a base for a queen-sized double bed. The quality of construction is first-class (of course!), but I could have bought a brand new assembled one for less than the price I payed for the materials! Making your own furniture no longer pays off in strict money terms, but at least you get what you want.
I am somewhat saddened by Australia's inability to compete in manufacturing, nowadays. This could come back to bite us in the future. On the other hand, I am pleased to be able to buy good furniture at such reasonable prices at Royal’s Furniture shop To see more furniture, please visit web-site www.easterncurio.com

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1 year ago
jim
Master
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Barnard-Cope were working until at least Circa 1911 & Grain Painted furniture ( Original ) is of higher value then tiger Oak wood.

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1 year ago
christine
Guest

I sold my furniture to an antique lover by sheer coincidence. He gave me exactly what I paid for the desk, dresser and double bed headboard and footboard. So, I broke even and I was happy!

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1 month ago
Woody
Guest

I have a dresser with that exact same sticker with the same stain painted over it! From my understanding my dresser is about 140 years old.

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